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Clean Eating for Busy Moms; Shopping Guide

 Clean Eating Food List

OK busy moms, yesterday we talked about some simple clean eating food swaps. Today, we are going to talk about various types of foods and why they are better for “clean eating”.

When you’re just starting out with clean eating, it can be tough to know where to start at the grocery store. You can follow the old saying “shop the perimeter”, but if you’re not used to doing that, it’s still a bit overwhelming.

So here is a clean eating food list for beginners. Please note that you may have adjust this a little for what’s available in your area, since we are live in different states. But it should give you a good starting point either way.

Also know that manufacturers do change their ingredients from time to time. It’s been my experience that if the label changes, the ingredients usually do too. And usually not for the better. So keep an eye out for ingredient changes. If you make it a habit to read the ingredient lists on a regular basis, you’ll never be caught by surprise.

CLEAN EATING SHOPPING LIST FOR BEGINNERS

Breads:

  • Ezekiel brand breads – Most often found in the freezer section. This brand of bread has several types to choose from, but read ingredients as not all are clean. They have tortillas as well.
  • Trader Joe’s brand whole grain breads – The two in particular that I know are clean are the Sprouted Multi-Grain bread and the California Protein bread.

Crackers:

Dairy & Non-Dairy:
Dairy is the source of much confusion for clean eaters. So here’s a general breakdown.

  • Milk – Raw milk is the cleanest milk you can get. But since it’s hard to find, expensive and even illegal in some states, the next best thing would be organic, full-fat milk. If you choose this route, it’s best to treat your milk as a fat and carbohydrate instead of a protein. Also know that homogenization is processing of dairy. You can go low fat, but the lower in fat you go, typically the more processed the milk is.
  • Cottage cheese (for those who eat it) – Full fat is best, but you can also use low fat. (NOT fat free.) That being said, it can be very difficult to find truly clean cottage cheese and again, the lower the fat, the more processing involved.
  • Yogurt – Always opt for Greek yogurt when you can. Plain yogurt (regular or Greek) is the only way to go. You can always mix in your own fruits and dab of honey or maple syrup if you need it flavored. Full fat though, not reduce or non-fat.
  • Cheese – Most cheeses are eaten in moderation due to their high fat content. Just be sure that if you buy it, you buy the real thing. No pre-shredded cheeses either (they have anti-caking agents added). If you need it shredded, buy the block and shred it yourself. Real grated Parmesan cheese is acceptable in moderation. (Note: Kraft brand Parmesan cheese is not clean. If it can sit on a shelf or in a cupboard for months, it’s not clean.  Buy the stuff in the refrigerator section.)
  • Unsweetened almond milk – Although a quick glance at the ingredient list may leave you wondering. It’s best to make your own if you can, but I buy the organic store version.
  • Unsweetened rice milk (made from brown rice, not white). Again, homemade is best.
  • Unsweetened soy milk – If you go this route, be sure to purchase the organic variety to avoid GMO’s.
  • Unsweetened coconut milk – This is NOT the stuff in the cartons. This is the stuff in the cans. Be sure to read labels here. The Thai Kitchen brand is clean and pretty widely available. Light coconut milk is perfectly fine in this case. Get 6-pack here on Amazon (affiliate link),

Poultry:

  • Eggs – These are a staple, especially egg whites. But most of the nutrition is in the yolks, so don’t leave them out too often. Try to avoid the carton egg whites.
  • Chicken & Turkey – Boneless, skinless poultry breasts are your best friends if you eat meat. But whole chickens are often the better deal and you get so much more out of them. If you can afford organic meats, it’s always a better way to go.

Beef:
Beef can be part of a clean eating diet so long as you choose grass fed and humanely raised beef. A butcher can help you select these. If you are wanting to forgo beef, try venison, bison or buffalo. Both are very similar in flavor.

Other meats:

  • Pork – While not everyone believes pork to be a clean food, it’s actually clean if you get the good quality versions. Processed pork should be avoided like the plague. Things like ham are definitely not part of a clean eating meal plan. Skip the Canadian bacon as well. (How did Canadian bacon ever get labeled as healthy anyway?)
  • Duck
  • Venison – This is a very lean meat and can be used in place of beef in most recipes.
  • Fish – Most fish is considered clean, just be careful of the mercury content found in most fish today. Also, please be sure you are buying sustainably. Your purchases have an impact here in a big way on the health of our oceans.

Produce:
This is where you really want to stock up. If you are concerned about pesticides but are on a tight budget, the general rule of thumb is to purchase organics for produce that has thin skin such as peaches, nectarines and all berries, and purchase regular items for produce that has thicker skin like bananas and oranges. Google “The Dirty Dozen” if you want to have a list of the worst pesticide laden produce or the “Clean 15” for the best produce to purchase conventionally. I learned so much over the years about this!

So this is where “Shop The Perimeter” really comes in. The produce section is your friend. Load up when you can as you’ll want most of your eating plan to be generated from this section of the store.

Fruits::

  • Apples
  • Oranges
  • Grapefruits
  • Banana
  • Avocados
  • Berries of all kinds
  • Cherries
  • Kiwi
  • Star fruit
  • Any other fresh fruit you enjoy

Veggies::

  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Spinach
  • Broccoli
  • Bell Peppers in any color
  • Zucchini
  • Eggplant
  • Squash of any variety
  • Kale
  • Chard
  • Collard greens
  • Okra
  • Green beans
  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Onions of any variety
  • Any other fresh veggie you enjoy

The Aisles:
When you do venture into the aisles of the store, you should only be there for a few, food related items such as:

  • Tea – particularly green tea
  • Coffee
  • Oatmeal – Just the plain kind. Nothing flavored. Opt for steel cut oats or traditional rolled oats. I personally use quick oats, but only on occasion. Most of my oatmeal recipes use steel cut or rolled oats. Quick oats are best for baking.
  • Canned items with no added sugar – There is a lot of debate as to whether or not canned items, even without added sugar, are clean due to the BPA’s in the cans. But if you do decide to purchase things like beans or tomato sauce in a can, read the ingredients! There should be no added sugar (sugar, evaporated cane juice, dextrose, fructose, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, etc…) in the list. Also, watch the sodium content in canned goods. It can add up quick! There are also more and more BPA free cans on the market these days. Costco is a great source for that as is Whole Foods.
  • Dry beans and legumes – like lentils, black beans, chickpeas, etc.
  • Brown rice
  • Whole wheat or whole grain (like brown rice) pasta
  • Other whole grains such as barley
  • Nuts – Again, read the ingredients here. Nuts should be the only ingredient on the package. Usually, this means you’ll be buying raw nuts.
  • Seeds – Quinoa is a seed and it’s wonderful stuff. I use it a lot. Sun flower seeds, sesame seeds, chia or flaxseed are all good choices.

Condiments, Spices and Natural Sweeteners:

  • Ketchup – It’s virtually impossible to find a clean ketchup. We don’t use it often, but we buy organic when we do.
  • Mustard – It’s getting harder and harder to find mustard without added sugar. OrganicVille puts out a tasty yellow mustard without added sugar. But if you can’t find regular yellow mustard that is clean, opt for mustard like Dijon or other varieties. It’s much easier to find clean mustard if you do.
  • Honey – The healthiest honey you can purchase is Manuka honey. I highly recommend it if it’s within your budget. Get it here on Amazon (affiliate link),
  • Pure Maple Syrup – Not the bottle syrups you get in the breakfast cereal aisle. Pancake syrup and pure maple syrup are NOT the same thing. Look for grade A or grade M pure maple syrup.
  • Molasses – Look for the unsulfured variety.Get it here on Amazon (affiliate link),
  • Spices – Any herbs you buy should come in bulk or a bottle. Never purchase seasoning packets. They are not clean by any means. Purchase singular herbs such as basil, parsley and thyme. Opt for garlic and onion powder, without salt. Avoid the herb blends unless you are comfortable with reading ingredient lists. Many have added sugars, even Mrs. Dash (though some of those blends are indeed clean, some are not).
  • Salt – I know most people try to reduce their salt intake, but salt is actually a vital mineral for our bodies, so getting good quality salt is important. I prefer the pink Himalayan Salt.

Flours:
This is another source of much confusion for newbies. So here’s what to look for:

  • Whole wheat flour
  • Whole wheat pastry flour – tough to find in some areas, but great for baking.
  • White whole wheat flour – Easier to find but not as dense as regular whole wheat flour. (It’s a different variety of wheat, but it’s still whole grain).
  • Coconut flour
  • Almond Flour
  • Other flours – If you are gluten intolerant, you will want to research other flours on gluten free sites.

So there you have it. It’s not a complicated list at all, but it should give you a good start. I hope it helps!

I am putting together an easy, 1 page, printable PDF food guide that you can print and hang on your refrigerator. Look for that soon!

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In this series, I will continue to touch upon more topics and tips, including, some of my favorite recipes, where to shop to eat clean on a budget, meal plans, on-the-go snacks, and more!

 

Thanks for tuning in, and if you found any of this useful, please “share” with some friends (it only takes about 10 seconds to share below).

 

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